The Big NHS Election Squabble – Pledges Thrown In

Jane Merrick writing in The Independent about Miliband and Cameron vying to be the saviour of the health service in war of words about costings

Labour and the Tories went to war over the NHS yesterday, after David Cameron’s pledge of £8bn extra for the health service by 2020 was undermined by footage of him warning that “unfunded spending commitments” would “wreck the NHS”.

Cameron and MilibandOur life in their hands !

The Prime minister tried to outdo Ed Miliband by announcing the extra cash that Simon Stevens, the chief executive of NHS England, has said is needed to prevent services being cut. Labour has pledged a lower figure, £2.5bn extra a year, funded by the mansions tax, a levy on tobacco companies and anti-tax avoidance measures. A leading independent health organisation pointed out that Labour was the only party not to meet the £8bn target, which it said was “worrying”.

The Lib-Dems have promised to meet the £8bn target through cutting tax reliefs, but the Tories have said they will not set out how they will raise the £8bn until after the election. Labour unearthed footage of Mr Cameron at PQMs in January, in which he warned against uncosted spending commitments for the NHS. He said at the time: “The real risk to the NHS is the risk of unfunded spending commitments bringing chaos to our economy, which would wreck our NHS. That is the risk and that is why the choice at the election will be to stick with the people with a long-term plan, not a Labour Party that would wreck our economy and wreck our NHS.”

Labour ceased on the comments, with Mr Miliband saying at the launch of his health manifesto in Manchester, in which he unveiled plans for one-to-one midwifery care: “The truth is that you can’t save the NHS if you don’t know where the money is coming from. You can only damage the NHS when you are planning colossal cuts in public spending, year on year on, which is what the Tories are planning. The bottom line is: you can’t fund the NHS on an IOU.”

But a Tory source said the Government’s record should speak for itself: “Labour said five years ago we couldn’t increase funding for the NHS, reduce the deficit and create jobs. They’re saying the same again today. Our response is: judge us on our track record – NHS spending this year is £7.3bn highrer in real terms than it was in 2010-11; we cut of the deficit by half as a proportion of GDP; and we’ve created nearly two million jobs.

“We’ve done it over the past five years – and we can do it again over the next five years.”

The NHS will continue to be one of the biggest election issues and after sufacing from it we won’t be able to breathe any easier”

More on this from The independent

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